The Association of Dietary Fatty Acids and Gut Microbiota Alterations in the Development of Neuropsychiatric Diseases: A Systematic Review

Kulvinder Kochar Kaur*, Gautam Allahbadia, and Mandeep Singh

The Association of Dietary Fatty Acids and Gut Microbiota Alterations in the Development of Neuropsychiatric Diseases: A Systematic Review.

Having reviewed earlier the role of probiotics in obesity and other associated metabolic disorders like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), engineering probiotics for cholera and other neuronal diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson disease with incidence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM) so much on the rise, Here the aim of this systematic review is to highlight the influence of dietary patterns, like fatty acids, other lipids on role of maternal stress and the neuropsychiatric disease (NPD) formation along with influence of probiotics in reverting them.

In this framework, it is of marked significance that the function of surveillance conducted by microglial cells via very dynamic as well as plastic morphological alterations. The microglial phenotype might switch (from ‘’surveying’’ to ‘’activated’’) as per the changes of neural activity, neuronal-microglial signals as well as synaptic communication.  A randomized, double-blind as well as stratified study of the effect of family violence on child behaviour documented that n-3 PUFAs nutritional intervention in children decreased the amount of psychological aggression in adult caregivers.

In this review lots of correlations that interrelate imbalanced intake of selected dietary FAs towards the chances of NPDs. By utilizing this current insight into the association of dietary lipids, disrupted GM population as well as alterations in neuroactive substances (especially DA as well as 5HT) one might enhance our understanding regarding NPD pathogenesis as well as design innovative therapeutic methods along with forming NPD related biomarkers for getting early diagnosis as well as personalized medicine.

Obes Res Open J. 2020; 7(1): 19-45. doi: 10.17140/OROJ-7-143