Publishing Research: From an Occupational Therapy Perspective

Emily F. Piven*

Corresponding Author

Emily F. Piven, OTD, MHE, OTRL

Retired Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy Department of Rehabilitation Sciences University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79902, USA E-mail: emilyh@utep.edu

Affiliation

Emily F. Piven, OTD, MHE, OTRL*

Retired Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79902, USA

Corresponding Author

Emily F. Piven, OTD, MHE, OTRL

Retired Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy Department of Rehabilitation Sciences University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79902, USA E-mail: emilyh@utep.edu

Article History

Received: January 17th, 2017 Accepted: January 18th, 2017 Published: January 18th, 2017

Cite this Article

Piven EF. Publishing research: From an occupational therapy perspective. Diabetes Res Open J. 2017; 3(1): e9- e11. doi: 10.17140/DROJ-3-e010

Copyright

Ā© 2017 Piven EF. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Doi

10.17140/DROJ-3-e010

Two years ago, at the inception of this Diabetes Research ā€“ Open Journal, I wrote an opinion article for the inaugural issue about the need for articles targeting secondary prevention.1 The journal has grown to provide many quantitative research articles that deal with important issues for managing tertiary issues, thus providing statistically significance current research. However, I failed to convince both the researcher and reviewers about the important of qualitative research.

I have published quantitative biomedical research linking heart rate to blood sugar, to find a non-invasive method of evaluating blood sugar.2-9 Since the first article was published in 2006, which disseminated the research through international and regional biomedical engineering conference proceedings, the studies have triggered both intensive inquiries and additional new research in this area.

Quantitative research provides the best science, but the outcomes may not empower people with diabetes to deal with the daily management of the continuous challenges they face with diabetes. More research must be completed that qualitatively adds to the body of knowledge that provides needed insight into what motivates and aids people to willingly change their routines, to incorporate every aspect of diabetes self-care into their lives. We all can agree how important initial adherence to recommendations by medical practitioners is when preventing the myriad of unfortunate complications of diabetes. Tertiary prevention is like attempting to put out a blazing fire in a forest while it is occurring, rather than blowing out the match that started the devastation. Early intervention has been proven to be the key to prevent diabetes complications.10,11

Further, the use of mixed-method methodologies crosses both domains and allows researchers to see both the objective data proving statistically significant change in behavior(s) as the result of a treatment program, while also providing insights about the lived experience of individuals and groups that participated in the programs.12,13,14 Survey research is useful when it has well-written pretested and statistically significant questions that can analyze issues for large groups, by reporting and comparing groups by age, sex, race, and income levels, etc.15,16 There is also a place for single case study research, though not generalizable, it creates deeper understanding of the issues that may prevent adherence for one person or one group at a time.17,18

I can share that it was my personal experience of living with type one diabetes that best helped me to design and shape experiential programs for individuals15,16 When first diagnosed, I skipped the hospitalization and the certified diabetes education classes. Instead, I learned about diabetes as a counselor of 5-year-old girls, while living at a residential diabetes summer camp nearby my home. It was the two-week immersion experience of ā€œlearning by doingā€ (a core principle of my occupational therapy profession) that facilitated learning about diabetes, while helping others, which made me stand strong. In addition, as I inquired about the challenges that Mexican-American elders faced, my research allowed me to design, write a program workbook, and develop a peer-led organization to help people who were non-adherent to take better care of themselves, even though I was from a different age and culture.19,20,21 In addition, I designed and evaluated diabetes education programs within a familiar nursing model using lay health workers called promotors (promotors) from the community to teach diabetes education concepts to people with depression.22,23

In conclusion, I am encouraging researchers to submit all levels of research to this journal. Restated, there is a place for each form of research because each form contributes something unique. Although qualitative research cannot be generalized, it must be said that all people are truly different and the many forms of this type of inquiry can potentially help researchers to design better treatment approaches that can change the future for people with diabetes.

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

The author declares not to have any conflict of interest.

1. Piven EF. Increasing adherence to the diabetes regimen: An occupational therapy perspective. Diabetes Res Open J. 2014; 1(1): e1-e2. doi: 10.17140/DROJ-1-e001

2. Reyes I, Nazeran H, Franco, M, et al. Wireless Photoplethysmographic Device for Heart Rate Variability Signal Acquisition and Analysis. 2012; Proceedings of the 34th Annual International IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Conference; August 28-September 1, 2012; San Diego, California, USA; EMBS; 2092-2095.

3. Reyes I, Nazeran H, Franco M, et al. Wireless Photoplethysmographic Device for Heart Rate Variability Signal Acquisition and Analysis. In: Conference Proceedings; 2012: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2012 34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE. San Diego, California, USA; EMBC; 2012: 2092-2095.

4. Franco M, Nazeran H, Reyes I, et al. Wireless Photoplethysmography Device for Heart Rate Variability Signal Acquistion and Analysis. 27th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference (SBEC), University of Texas at Arlington, April 29-May 1, 2011. In: International Journal of Medical Implants and Devices, Jafar Vossoughi, ed. 2(2), abstract 54, 2011 (3 pages).

5. Amanipour R, Nazeran H, Franco M, et al. A Pilot Investigation into the Effects of Blood Glucose Levels on Specific Features of HRV Signal in Persons with Diabetes. 27th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference (SBEC) 2011. University of Texas at Arlington, USA: International Journal of Medical Implants and Devices. April 29-May 1, 2011; Jafar Vossoughi, ed. 5(2): 94-97.

6. Amanipour RM, Nazeran H, Reyes I, et al. The Effects of Blood Glucose Changes on Frequency-domain Measures of HRV Signal in Type 1 Diabetes. May 24 2012; CONIELECOMP 2012 - 22nd International Conference on Electronics Communications and Computing: 50-54 5 p. 6189880.

7. Nazeran H, BolaƱos M, Haltiwanger E, et al. Heart rate variability signal features quantify normal ranges of blood sugars in healthy individuals. In: Saha S, ed. Biomedical Engineering Recent Developments. Washington DC, USA: Medical and Engineering Publishers; 2007: 26-29.

8. Nazeran H, BolaƱos M, Haltiwanger E, et al. Heart Rate Variability Signal Features Quantify Normal Ranges of Blood Sugars in Healthy Individuals. Biomedical Engineering Recent Developments. Washington DC, USA; Medical and Engineering Publishers; 2007: 26-29.

9. BolaƱos M, Nazeran H, Haltiwanger E. Comparison of Heart Rate Variability Studies Derived from Electrocardiography and Photoplethysmography in Healthy Individuals. Proceedings of the EMBS 28th Annual International Conference Proceedings. August 30- September 3, 2006 in New York City, USA: Sa A 03.1 pp 4289-4294.

10. Cortez DN, Macedo MM, Souza DA, et al. Evaluating the effectiveness of an empowerment program for self-care in type 2 diabetes: A cluster randomized trial. BMC Public Health. 2017; 17(1): 41. doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3937-5

11. Ojo O. An overview of diabetes and its complications. Diabetes Res Open J. 2016; 2(2): e4-e6. doi: 10.17140/DROJ-2-e005

12. Haltiwanger EP. Effect of a group adherence intervention for Mexican-American older adults with type 2 diabetes. Am J Occup Ther. 2012; 66(4): 447-454. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2012.004457

13. Haltiwanger EP, Brutus H. A culturally sensitive diabetes peer support for older Mexican-Americans. Occup Ther Int. 2012; 19(2): 67-75. doi: 10.1002/oti.320

14. Haltiwanger EP. Experience of Mexican-American elders with diabetes: A phenomenological study. Occup Ther Health Care. 2012; 26(2-3): 150-162. doi: 10.3109/07380577.2012.694585

15. Piven EF, Nazeran H. The experience of Mexican-Americans transitioning to insulin pump technology. J Community Med Health Educ. 2013; 3(4): 222-227. doi: 10.4172/2161-0711.10002222

16. Piven EF, Lovett U, Nazeran H, et al. Issue of adjustment to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion devices. The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice. 2014; 12(3): 1-5.

17. Piven EF, Duran R. Special Issue Paper: Reduction of non-adherent behaviour in a Mexican-American adolescent with type 2 diabetes. Occup Ther Int. 2014; 21(1): 42-51. doi: 10.1002/oti.1363

18. Haltiwanger EP, Galindo, DM. Reduction of depressive symptoms in an elderly Mexican-American female with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A single-subject study. Occup Ther Int. 2013; 20(1): 35-44. doi: 10.1002/oti.1338

19. Piven, EF. Activity and occupational demands of type two diabetes: The voice of Mexican-American older adults. Phys Occup Ther in Geriatr. 2014; 33(1): 34-52. doi: 10.3109/02703181.2014.980961

20. Haltiwanger E. Groupo de Apoyo Bridges/ Bridges Diabetes Support GroupĀ©. 14 font bold edition for low vision. El Paso, Texas, USA; Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center; 2007.

21. Haltiwanger E. Groupo de Apoyo Bridges/Bridges Diabetes Support GroupĀ©.16 font bold edition for low vision. El Paso, Texas, USA; Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center; 2007.

22. Lantican L, Haltiwanger E, Moya E. Self-Empowering and Social Support Enhancement Program Participant ManualĀ©. El Paso, Texas, USA; Paso del Norte Foundation; 2009.

23. Lantican L, Haltiwanger E, Moya E. Self-Empowering and Social Support Enhancement Program Trainer ManualĀ©. El Paso, Texas, USA; Paso del Norte Foundation; 2009.

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