Pramod Kumar Giri, PhD

Associate Research Scientist
Department of Infectious Diseases
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602 USA

Biography

EDUCATION

• 2006 Ph.D. Microbiology, Immunology & Biochemistry
• 2000 M.S. Biotechnology
• 1998 B.S. Life Sciences

RESEARCH WORK EXPERIENCE

• 2011- Present: Associate Research Scientist, Department of Infectious Diseases, College of veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
o Interaction between Mycobacteria and host immune cells
o Alteration of macrophage function during TB and HIV co-infection.
o Modulation of PAMPs mediated immune response by HIV1-Nef protein in human macrophages.
o Modulation the Function of regulatory T cells by HIV1-Nef protein.
• 2009 – 2011: Research Associate, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
o Role of Ets transcription factor Elf-1 in the development of NKT cells and NK cells.
o Role of human group 1 CD1 molecule in transgenic murine model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.
• 2006 – 2009: Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA (PI; Dr. Jeff Schorey)
o Exosomes released by mycobacterial-infected macrophages activate antigen-specific T cell immunity.
o Proteomic analysis of exosomes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected and culture filtrate protein-treated macrophages.
• 2001 – 2006: Ph.D, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India
o Evaluation of new generation Th1 adjuvants for the development of anti-tuberculous mucosal vaccine based on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85 complex proteins.

Research Interest

His research interests include: Vaccine development, adjuvant formulation, assay development, bioengineered Exosomes, immunology and inflammation, animal models of disease, animal experimentation (various surgeries and other less-invasive procedures), protein biochemistry, Bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3), systems and integrative biology, cell deaths, cell cycle, signaling networks, microRNA, mRNA and miRNA expression at single live cell level using SmartFlare RNA detection probes, in vitro human primary cell models, in vivo adoptive cell transfer, immunotherapy, Bioplex/Luminex and Quansys platform, multiparameter flow cytometry, cell purification by autoMACS, intracellular signaling pathways in human and mouse cells. Passionate about mentoring and teaching.

Scientific Activities

HONORS & AWARDS

• Recipient of Senior Research Fellowship of Indian council of Medical Research (ICMR), Gov. of India, New Delhi [2004-2006].
• Recipient of Junior Research Fellowship of Indian council of Medical Research (ICMR), Gov. of India, New Delhi [2002-2004].
• Qualified, National Eligibility Test of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) Govt. of India, New Delhi. [Dec. 2001].

SCIENTIFIC MEMBERSHIP

• Member- Society of Mucosal Immunology, USA
• Member- The American Association of Immunologists, USA

Publications

1. Giri PK, Sharma A, Estes DM. Is A20 a suitable target to enhance dendritic cell antigen presentation? Immunotherapy. 2011; 3(11): 1289-1290. doi: 10.2217/imt.11.128.
2. Giri PK, Sharma A, Estes DM. New players in immune regulation. Immunotherapy. 2011; 3(11): 1290-1291.
3. Giri PK, Sharma A, Estes DM. mRNA-29: a governor of IFN-γ production by T cells. Immunotherapy. 2011; 3(11): 1291-1292.
4. Choi HJ, Geng Y, Cho H, Li S, Giri PK, Felio K, Wang CR. Differential requirements for the Ets transcription factor Elf-1 in the development of NKT cells and NK cells. Blood. 2011; 117(6):1880-1887 doi: 10.1182/blood-2010-09-309468.
5. Giri PK, Kruh N, Dobos-Elder KM, Schorey JS. Proteomic analysis identifies highly antigenic proteins in exosomes from M. tuberculosis-infected and culture filtrate protein-treated macrophages . Proteomics. 2010; 10(17): 3190-3202. doi: 10.1002/pmic.200900840.
6. Giri PK, Verma I and Khuller GK. Adjunct immunotherapy with Ag85 complex proteins based subunit vaccine in a murine model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Immunotherapy. 2009; 1(1): 31-37. doi: 10.2217/1750743X.1.1.31.
7. Giri PK. How could we have better vaccines against TB? Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2008; 8(11):1759-1772.
8. Giri PK, Schorey JS. Exosomes derived from M. bovis BCG infected macrophages activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro and in vivo. PLoS ONE. 2008; 3(6): e2461. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002461.
9. Giri PK, Khuller GK. Is intranasal vaccination a feasible solution for tuberculosis? Expert Rev Vaccines. 2008; 7(9): 1341-1356. doi: 10.1586/14760584.7.9.1341.
10. Giri PK, Verma I and Khuller GK. Enhanced immunoprotective potential of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85 complex proteins based vaccine against airway Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge following intranasal administration. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2006; 47(2): 233-241.
11. Giri PK, Verma I and Khuller GK. Protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG against airway Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in mice. Journal of Infection. 2006; 53(5): 350-356.
12. Giri PK, Sable SB, Verma I and Khuller GK. Comparative evaluation of intranasal and subcutaneous route of immunization for development of mucosal vaccine against experimental tuberculosis. FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2005; 45(1): 87-93.