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  • 2019, July

    case report

    Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in Postpartum Hemorrhage: A Case ReportOpen Access

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    Abstract [+]

    Background

    Postpartum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity. The significant impact of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) on maternal mortality can be reduced if timely measures are implemented. Transcatheter arterial embolisation (TAE) is an alternative therapeutic strategy for PPH.

    Case report

    We report a case of postpartum haemorrhage which was managed by transcatheter arterial embolization in lieu of hysterectomy to preserve fertility and menstruation in a 27-year-old patient.

    Conclusion

    The critical role of obstetrician, anaesthesiologist and interventional radiologist as a team, improve the quality of care and patient safety.

    Keywords

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH); Peripartum hysterectomy; Transarterial embolisation.


  • 2019, May

    case report

    Pneumocephalus Caused by an Epidural Ozone Injection for Treatment of Disc ProlapseOpen Access

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    Abstract [+]

    Pneumocephalus is a complication seen either after head trauma or post-neurosurgical procedure. It can be life-threatening if it turns into tension pneumocephalus. The presence of intracranial air indicates the presence of an open communication of cerebrospinal fluid. Air enters dura matter even without connection. Thin air flows upstream along the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathway. Herein, we report a case of pneumocephalus in a 62-year-old female after epidural injection of Bupivacaine and Ozone for the treatment of a prolapsed disc. She was shifted to our hospital post-epidural injection for the management of severe headache. Though it is a rare complication, keeping this in mind will help to quickly diagnose, if need arises.

    Keywords

    Pneumocephalus; Head trauma; CT; Thunderclap headache.


  • 2019, May

    case report

    Hardware Causing Hard Times: Use of the SuperNO2VA™ Nasal PAP Device to Address Airway Challenges Caused by Eroding Mandibular HardwareOpen Access

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    Abstract [+]

    Background

    Maintenance of the airway and adequate ventilation are essential for the anesthetized patient and may be compromised in patients with pan-facial trauma, abnormal dentition, abnormal mandibular space, or presence of dental hardware. We present an unusual case of a patient with a lack of natural mandibular structure and exposed mechanical hardware with fistula complicating intubation and ventilation prior to surgery.

    Case Presentation

    A 35-year-old male with a history of a self-inflicted gunshot to the left submandibular region approximately 6 years prior was scheduled for urgent mandibular hardware removal, closure of left facial fistula, and removal of several teeth. Pre-oxygenation and ventilation were complicated by extruding hardware and eroded skin, causing interference with a conventional facemask seal. The patient was pre-oxygenated using the SuperNO2VA™ nasal mask with which an adequate seal was achieved without use of a nasal trumpet and with a modified grip. Tracheal intubation via oral video laryngoscopy was successful, and the case proceeded uneventfully.

    Conclusion

    Adequate ventilation and airway maintenance can be difficult to achieve in patients with abnormal facial structure or mandibular mechanical hardware using conventional methods. The SuperNO2VA™ nasal mask can address airway issues for these patients peri-operatively.

    Keywords

    Anesthesiology; Airway management; Difficult airway; Airway devices; Difficult intubation; Ventilation; Oxygenation; Facial trauma; Mask ventilation.


  • 2019, May

    case report

    Anesthetic Considerations in Bilateral Congenital Anophthalmia: A Rare Clinical EntityOpen Access

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    Abstract [+]

    Congenital anomalies planned for ocular surgeries range from the rare to atypical to common. Many of this rare ophthalmopathy are associated with clinical syndromes and have important anesthetic implications. Not only is it important to know the syndrome we are dealing with, but it’s also the more important to understand the systems that are involved, the extent of involvement, potential anesthetic complications, right from the cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, neuromuscular, genitourinary systems to airway. Understanding these aspects becomes more important in rare clinical scenarios as it helps to plan the case, anticipate and treat the complications. Congenital anophthalmia is one of the rare conditions with an incidence of <3/1000 with microphthalmia reported in up to 11% of blind children, hence we report a rare case of bilateral congenital anophthalmia planned for excision of right ocular swelling.

    Keywords

    Ophthalmopathies; Congenital anophthalmia; Microophthalmia; Ocular surgery.


  • 2018, December

    case report

    Cranial and Spinal Subdural Hygroma Following Lumbar Epidural for Labour AnalgesiaOpen Access

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    Abstract [+]

    Intracranial hygroma is a rare and probably missed complication of epidural analgesia secondary to accidental dural breech. The patient presented had a presumed spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak with symptoms of intracranial hypotension. Unusually the patient had both an intracranial subdural hygroma and rarely reported extensive spinal intradural (extra-arachnoid) collection following a lumbar epidural, administered in labour. Given the potential for progression to symptomatic neurological deficits, anesthetists should consider subdural hygroma when encountering patients with features of intracranial hypotension, or altered neurology following epidural. Pathophysiology, imaging and management are discussed.

    Keywords

    Subdural hygroma; Epidural; Dural puncture.


About the Journal

Research and Practice in Anesthesiology – Open Journal (RPAOJ) aims to discuss all the topics related to pain relief and its memory of a patient, from a surgery.

Generally, anesthesia is of two types: local anesthesia, which is body part specific and general anesthesia, which is instant sedation through an Intravenous line (IV), where a thin plastic tube inserted into the vein, a face mask, through the nose or throat of the patient. The drugs used in this process are called ‘Anaesthetics’.

Openventio aims at the widespread propagation of all the detailed matters related to anesthesiology and to bring information from all the authors and diverse sources in a uniform way through our well-designed open access portal.

Aims and Scope

Research and Practice in Anesthesiology – Open Journal (RPAOJ) is dedicated to the open dissemination and robust discussion in the area of anesthesiology and its related fields.

RPAOJ covers a wide array of subjects as given below

  • Pain management
  • Critical care medicine
  • Cardiothoracic anaesthesia
  • Anesthesia over obesity
  • Chronic pain
  • Neuro anaesthesia
  • Regional anaesthesia
  • Paediatric anaesthesia

Submissions for this journal are accepted from the very basic aesthetic research to the latest research advancements.

The contributors of RPAOJ include surgeons, physicians, pharmacists, registered nurses, adjunct healthcare professionals, clinicians, physiotherapists, housekeepers, occupational therapists, complementary therapists, volunteers, investigators, practitioners, social workers, nursing assistants, educators, practicing anaesthesia providers, students of various universities and general communities from different parts of the world.

The journal welcomes all types of articles such as original research, review, case-report, mini-review, editorial, short-communication, book review, opinion, commentary, letter to the editor, conference proceedings, technical report, errata, illustrations, etc.

We are open to receive comments or any corrections from subject experts and our audiences to improve the quality of our journal.