Nephrology Open Journal

Special Editions


  • Global Health Policy and Kidney Disease

    A Special Edition by


    Nephrology – Open Journal (NPOJ)


    Submissions deadline: October 31st, 2017(Publication Free of charges)


    Release Date: November 30th, 2017 (Accepted papers will be published online immediately).



    Special Edition Editors


    Guest Editor


    Soundarapandian Vijayakumar, PhD

    Department of Pediatrics
    Senior Scientist at Stanford University
    Adjunct Associate Research Scientist at Columbia University
    USA
    E-mail: svijay4@stanford.edu


    Associate Guest Editor


    Pavithra Vijayakumar

    Yale Medical College
    USA
    E-mail: pavithra.vijayakumar@yale.edu





     Introduction of Special Edition


     Global Health Policy and Kidney Disease


    The special edition on “Global Health Policy and Kidney Disease” is an initiative by the Nephrology Open Journal to highlight the present and future challenges in kidney diseases faced by the global health community.

    As the world’s population ages, and rates of diabetes and obesity rise even in developing countries, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease markers has risen to 10-13% of the adult population, and kidney disease was the 13th leading cause of death in 2013. Kidney diseases contribute to the morbidity of other chronic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and to the morbidity of infectious diseases like sepsis and influenza, further heightening the need for a more concerted worldwide effort to spread awareness and prevention. Unchecked, kidney disease often progresses to end stage renal disease, which necessitates high-cost dialysis or transplant procedures, or death and CKD remains one of the few growing causes of mortality, despite the development of effective clinical practice guidelines.

    To tackle these problems, several research and resource gaps must be addressed. We need to be able to detect kidney disease earlier, and these tests need to be made accessible in resource-poor countries. More kidney specialists need to be trained, and general practitioners need to be made more aware of the ways in which they can help their patients manage their kidney disease. Dialysis and transplantation need to be distributed more equitably throughout the world.

    New treatments that can better slow or stop the progression of disease need to be developed. And, surveillance of kidney disease around the world needs to improve, so we can monitor the progress we make as we continue to fight the growing burden of this disease. This special edition invites manuscripts from all disciplines that will contribute to our ability to address any of these needs.



    Dr. Soundarapandian Vijayakumar

    (Guest Editor)







    Case Report


    A Case Report of Carcinoid Tumor of the Kidney

    Ahmed Anas Zaougui*, Somuah Tenkorang, Aboubakry Sow, Soufiane Mellas, Mohammed Fadl Tazi, Abdelhak Khallouk, Mohammed Jamal El Fassi, Jalal Eddine El Ammari and Moulay Hassan Farih

    Provisional PDF1.94 MB1.94 MB


    Mini Review


    The Role of Primary Cilia in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease Revisited

    Alina Guseynova, Pavithra Vijayakumar and Soundarapandian Vijayakumar*

    Provisional PDF724 KB724 KB


  • Current Trends in Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    A Special Edition by


    Nephrology – Open Journal (NPOJ)


    Submissions deadline: October 31st, 2017


    Release Date: November 30th, 2017 (Accepted papers will be published online immediately).



    Special Edition Editors


    Guest Editor


    Soundarapandian Vijayakumar, PhD

    Department of Pediatrics
    Senior Scientist at Stanford University
    Adjunct Associate Research Scientist at Columbia University
    USA
    E-mail: svijay4@stanford.edu


    Associate Guest Editor


    Pavithra Vijayakumar

    Yale Medical College
    USA
    E-mail: pavithra.vijayakumar@yale.edu





     Introduction of Special Edition


     Current Trends in Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury


    The special edition on “Current Trends in Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury” is an initiative by the Nephrology Open Journal to highlight the current advances in both basic and clinical research in this field.

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a general term for heterogeneous disorders affecting kidney structure and function, which have a significant impact on global public health. It is currently defined as ‘kidney damage or GFR <60 ml/minute/1.73 m2 for three months or more, irrespective of the cause’ and is a common disorder affecting up to 16% of the population worldwide. On the other hand, Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a syndrome that results in a sudden decrease in kidney function or kidney damage within a few hours or few days. It is common in patients who are in the hospital, especially in intensive care units. Some of the major causes of AKI include decreased blood flow to the kidneys due to any underlying factor (such as hypertension, a heart attack, or the use of NSAIDs), direct damage to the kidneys resulting from many factors including sepsis and glomerulonephritis, and blockage of the urinary tract bladder, prostate or cervical cancer, or kidney stones.

    Current advances in CKD and AKI highlight our increasing understanding of the nuanced interaction of kidney with other organs. For example, recent clinical studies indicate that exposure to proton pump inhibitors, used by an estimated 15 million Americans, associates with increased risk of incident CKD, CKD progression, and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Similarly, the LEADER trial demonstrates that people who have type 2 diabetes and prior cardiovascular disease are at a higher risk of developing CKD. In this context, there are new discussions emerging on the use of Vitamin D treatment in CKD and AKI. In basic research, new approaches such CRISPR/Cas gene editing systems, pharmacogenomics and the use of miRNAs have the potential to accelerate our understanding of as well as offer therapeutic intervention for CKD and AKI. In terms of surgical approaches, there is renewed interest in nephron-sparing surgery versus radial nephrectomy.

    This special edition invites manuscripts from all disciplines that will contribute to our basic understanding of various aspects of CKD and AKI including renal fibrosis, polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and glomerulonephritis as well as advances in clinical research and therapeutic interventions related to AKI and CKD.



    Dr. Soundarapandian Vijayakumar

    (Guest Editor)







    Research


    Study of Intradialytic Hypertension: A Single Centre Analysis

    Paike Nilrohit B*, Bhange Nilesh R, Ukadgaonkar Ajeya N, Gadekar Kshitija G and Kulkarni Sudhir G

    Provisional PDF580 KB580 KB


  • Kidney Transplantation and Glomerulonephritides

    A Special Edition by


    Nephrology – Open Journal (NPOJ)


    Submissions deadline: December 31st, 2017


    Release Date: February 15th, 2018 (Accepted papers will be published online immediately).



    Special Edition Editors


    Guest Editor


    Nikolaos Skartsis, MD, PhD

    Clinical Instructor
    Department of Medicine
    University of California San Francisco
    521 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0532
    San Francisco, CA 94143, USA






     Introduction of Special Edition


    The special edition on "Kidney Transplantation and Glomerulonephritides" is an initiative by the Nephrology Open Journal to highlight the current advances in basic and clinical research in this field.

    Kidney transplantation is the gold-standard therapy for End-Stage-Renal-Disease. In the absence of allograft specific tolerance, lifelong immunosuppression is a “sine qua non” condition for engraftment of an HLA incompatible organ. Unfortunately, organ transplantation is plagued by an unacceptably high incidence of chronic allograft rejection due to persistent and uncontrolled sub-clinical alloimmune inflammation and calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity. In addition, transplant recipients face a greatly increased risk of opportunistic infections and malignancies that are consequences of global immune suppression. On the other hand, a group of immunologically-mediated renal diseases affecting the glomerulus, termed glomerulonephritides, are also rendering the patient chronically dependent on immunosuppression to suppress disease activity.

    Over the last decades, attempts to re-educate the immune system to accept a foreign organ as self, have been fruitful in the laboratory, where transplantation tolerance has been achieved in various rodent and primate models.Many of these approaches utilized biologic agents including co-stimulation blockade to modify T cell activation. In most of the cases of experimental transplant tolerance the predominant mechanism relates to emergence of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Cell-based therapy trials in human transplantation and autoimmune diseases are currently testing the adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells. In the field of glomerulonephritides, similar approaches using biologic agents have been undertaken.

    This special edition invites manuscripts from all disciplines that will contribute to our basic understanding of various aspects of kidney transplantation and glomerulonephritides as well as advances in clinical research and therapeutic interventions related to the field.


               APC:


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    Dr. Nikolaos Skartsis

    (Guest Editor)